One night in Trivandrum and communist posters of Kerala

We had one night in Trivandrum – few hours in between the trains to kill. Our train to Madras was at 4am in the morning, so we left the rucksacks in the cloakroom and went to see the city by night. It was around 10 pm. With plenty of time in our hands and the camera, we went to the city. We have noticed a very interesting round building. It was Indian Coffee House, one of the most interesting ICH buildings I have seen. Kind of spiral construction with the triangle shaped windows (no glass, just triangle holes!). When we entered the building and were looking for a free table we had to  ‘climb’ – the building was constructed like a snail shell and the floor was continually going up.

Look at us enjoying the food there 🙂

We were passing very wide street, probably very busy during the day. Now there were only rickshaws and old, very old buses. On the opposite side some old or maybe unfinished buildings covered with the new and old, partially ripped bollywood movies posters. And among them, just in the middle a huge billboard with… Lenin! Later was even better. There were billboards with Marks, Engels, Lenin and Stalin together! Hanging along the streets garlands with the hammer and sickle. Abbey like constructions with the communist heroes’ posters or statues inside. Many of the posters were with the motive of man and woman that looked really familiar. I realised that they are depicting the statue of Worker and Kolkhoz Woman, which is used by Mosfilm (the oldest Russian film production company) as its logo, and can be seen at the beginning of all movies.  That night in  Trivandrum reminded me the parade for the anniversary Great October Socialist Revolution in Moscow.

Kerala is not only communist governed state, but also has the Catholicism as one of the main religions that was brought there by Portuguese. We were often asked where come from. As Polish, we were immediately associated with the communism and with the Polish pope. After we explaining that the communism collapsed in our country over 20 years ago, people were usually very disappointed. It was amazing how enthusiastic Keralan are about the communism.

My pictures from that night are below. Here you can read more about the phenomenon of communism in India and Kerala.

One night in Trivandrum and communist posters of Kerala

We had one night in Trivandrum – few hours in between the trains to kill. Our train to Madras was at 4am in the morning, so we left the rucksacks in the cloakroom and went to see the city by night. It was around 10 pm. With plenty of time in our hands and the camera, we went to the city. We have noticed a very interesting round building. It was Indian Coffee House, one of the most interesting ICH buildings I have seen. Kind of spiral construction with the triangle shaped windows (no glass, just triangle holes!). When we entered the building and were looking for a free table we had to  ‘climb’ – the building was constructed like a snail shell and the floor was continually going up.

Look at us enjoying the food there 🙂

We were passing very wide street, probably very busy during the day. Now there were only rickshaws and old, very old buses. On the opposite side some old or maybe unfinished buildings covered with the new and old, partially ripped bollywood movies posters. And among them, just in the middle a huge billboard with… Lenin! Later was even better. There were billboards with Marks, Engels, Lenin and Stalin together! Hanging along the streets garlands with the hammer and sickle. Abbey like constructions with the communist heroes’ posters or statues inside. Many of the posters were with the motive of man and woman that looked really familiar. I realised that they are depicting the statue of Worker and Kolkhoz Woman, which is used by Mosfilm (the oldest Russian film production company) as its logo, and can be seen at the beginning of all movies.  That night in  Trivandrum reminded me the parade for the anniversary Great October Socialist Revolution in Moscow.

Kerala is not only communist governed state, but also has the Catholicism as one of the main religions that was brought there by Portuguese. We were often asked where come from. As Polish, we were immediately associated with the communism and with the Polish pope. After we explaining that the communism collapsed in our country over 20 years ago, people were usually very disappointed. It was amazing how enthusiastic Keralan are about the communism.

My pictures from that night are below. Here you can read more about the phenomenon of communism in India and Kerala.

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